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TOPIC: San Diego Post rain courses

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shaunstorm123
San Diego Post rain courses
GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    September 9, 2009


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Monday January 28, 2019 1:32 PM
Worthy topic for those crazy wet Winters we get every so often. With Salt Creek (RIP) gone, what courses in San Diego handle the rain the best or dry out the quickest. If there is one thing that destroys my game, its mud. Takes several range sessions to get back to short arming everything.
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 Message #90426
Alex326
RE: San Diego Post rain courses
Member Since:
    November 20, 2015


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Tuesday January 29, 2019 8:37 PM
Aviara and The Crossings were both mud free this past weekend. I'm sure the great weather helped dry things out. Seemed like every fairway at the crossings was built with slope to aid in quick runoff
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 Message #90453 - This was a reply to message #90426
Rat-Patrol
RE: San Diego Post rain courses
GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    April 20, 2013


Favorite Golfer:
    My Grandpa was
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    Balboa Park GC


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Wednesday January 30, 2019 3:49 PM
Coronado.
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 Message #90458 - This was a reply to message #90453
SCGolf
RE: San Diego Post rain courses

Member Since:
    April 29, 2005


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Thursday January 31, 2019 2:39 PM
Good question... without knowing the amount of rain falling over what period, it's only possible to make a generalizations.

Every square inch of ground has some capacity to hold water. Each course's soil profile is distinctive. Profiles run parallel to the surface and has different properties and characteristics than layers above and below. Many courses with heavy traffic will see compaction. Not a good environment for vegetation (in this case grass). Compaction is a barrier that does not allow water to percolate. Water must then find a alternate route to vacate. When the soil has gone beyond it saturation point, you have over-saturation conditions. Mud exists when there's too much water, not enough vegetation or soil.

Water may vacate via a variety of systems. Drainage (natural or man-made), percolation or heat/wind. Most courses in SoCal were built with push-up greens (literally, bulldozers pushed soil into a pile and greens are higher than fairways). Most courses have migrated to USGA sand based greens. They'll be the first to dry. Water weighs 8.34 lbs/gal. When you have significant elevation changes and enough water, the weight of water will 'push" water to (presumably) drainage. Water damage is as lethal to grass as frost. Not only does it suffocates under water but, it's also at risk of tearing at the node from golfers walking/playing. Also, susceptible to fungus. Sand based greens helps courses superintendents by creating a more stable environment. Unfortunately, sand based fairways aren't economically feasible for most courses. Naturally, Mother Nature can help a course dry with some sun and/or wind. At some point, you'll see a crusty profile, where the top layer is dry and lower in the profile is still wet... a playing condition most amateurs wouldn't recognize.

In my experience, it isn't the first rains. The ground's already saturated, water's trying to perc. We're a little crusty up top and Wham, the second storm comes through and there's no place for water to go. We loose our tension between layers, mud forms, roots have nothing to hold on to and our superintendent doesn't have enough Turface to throw onto problem areas... sucks.

As a player, I've played some of my best round in the rain. In driving rain, I like to drive low and almost skip balls on the vacating water. When it's misty, I'm driving high ball and carrying run-offs. I know greens are going to be uber soft so we're pin hunting. Even if I can't get there, I know I'm inside 6' from 30 yards for an easy 1-putt (cuz there won't be as much break in the wet conditions).

Don't know if that helps you... that's my thought process in evaluating courses I'd like to play during/after a storm.

FIGHT ON!!!
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 Message #90468 - This was a reply to message #90426
Rat-Patrol
RE: San Diego Post rain courses
GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    April 20, 2013


Favorite Golfer:
    My Grandpa was
Favorite Golf Course:
    Balboa Park GC


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Thursday January 31, 2019 2:50 PM
Coronado
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 Message #90469 - This was a reply to message #90468
AndrewZ28
RE: San Diego Post rain courses
GK Event: Played in a GK Event GK Cup: Past & Current Champions of The GK Cup

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    February 22, 2012


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Thursday January 31, 2019 6:07 PM
I think after today you're screwed all around.

Actually, after playing the GK Plays at La Costa last time after a bunch of rain I'm saying the changes they made to drainage really helped. The rough was brutal (couldn't cut it) but the fairways, tees and greens were on point. It was super surprising for La Costa since that place used to be a swamp after rains.

I would also think something like the Crossings would be good. Low lying areas are probably bad but with the hills and pretty tight fairways I'm guessing the run off is pretty decent.
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 Message #90470 - This was a reply to message #90469

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