Discussions in --- Use This to POST ---
Moderated By JohnnyGK

Forums
Greenskeeper.org
--- Use This to POST ---
How often should you change Drivers to not be l...
YOUR SETTINGSLIST FORUMSLIST TOPICSSEARCH

TOPIC: How often should you change Drivers to not be losing distance?

PRINT TOPICSEND THIS TO A FRIEND

Listing 1 to 10 of 10 Replies

PAGES: 1
Nickesquire
How often should you change Drivers to not be losing distance?
GK Event: Played in a GK Event SCGA GK Golf Club: Member GKGC EAGLE: GKGC Eagle Supporter

Member Since:
    August 11, 2007


Favorite Golfer:
    Jack-Freddie-Tiger-Rory
Favorite Golf Course:
    Pebble Poppy Maderas


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 8:51 AM
TEST: Should You Buy A New Driver Every Year? By: Chris Chaney


Some may call it leaving no stone unturned or simply suffering from FOMO — the fear of missing out — but there’s always that shred of doubt that creeps into the casual golfer’s mind when they see a fellow player hitting the latest and greatest from equipment companies.

Am I leaving distance on the table? Is my equipment holding me back? Do I need to spend another few hundred bucks to keep up?

There’s no other club in the bag that elicits this time of reaction quite like the driver. Not only have more advanced analytics proven the importance of the longest club in the bag, but the honest truth is that, with few exceptions, the driver is the most fun club in the bag to hit.

Thankfully for golfers everywhere, MyGolfSpy put an age-old question to the test: are new drivers worth the investment every year?

The test was a simple one. They took their top-performing drivers from their Most Wanted testing from each of the past five years and saw how they stacked up against one another. Does a driver that hit shelves in 2016 still stand up to the “technological advancements” promised by OEM marketing departments?


The contenders were as follows:

2016 – TaylorMade M1
2017 – Srixon Z565
2018 – Ping G400 LST
2019 – Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero
2020 – Ping G410 LST

Using the same criteria as their previous Most Wanted tests, 35 testers were tasked to take 2,500 combined shots with each driver using Foresight GCQuad Launch Monitors. Then MGS calculated strokes gained values, distance and forgiveness to determine the best performing driver.

The results, especially for those who are hesitant to spend money each year on a new driver, were encouraging. According to MGS, the top-5 shook out by year as 2020, 2016, 2018, 2019, 2017.

Here’s what MGS concluded.

“Yes, the newest driver won, but a five-year-old driver finished second overall in this test,” they concluded. “In fact, the top-3 drivers in this test were separated by less than a yard and the top 4 were less than 2 yards apart. The reality is that the USGA has manufacturers more or less on lockdown. Real advancement typically takes 3-5 years to materialize and even then breakthrough technology stories are largely cover for tighter tolerances made possible by new materials and improved manufacturing processes.

“Real or otherwise, the advancement of technology will continue and performance will improve…albeit by incrementally smaller margins with each passing year. With that, it’s important to note that while the newest driver in this test was the best driver, there are no guarantees it means better performance for you.”

What can you take away from this test? Unless you’re using a driver that’s more than 5-7 years old, you’re not likely to see much, if any, improvement in distance or forgiveness.

If you want to buy a new driver every year or every other year, more power to you. You may see incremental improvements, but the data suggests unless you’re making a switch after a long period with the same club, you won’t see vast improvements in your metrics, all things being equal.

[[Edited by Nickesquire on Monday December 28, 2020 10:42 AM]]
REPLY
The goal has always been long and straight! But since I can no longer hit them long, hopefully straighter could be achieved more than occasionally?
 Message #97385
sparky14
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GK Event: Played in a GK Event GKGC BIRDIE: GKGC Birdie Supporter SCGA GK Golf Club: Member

Member Since:
    March 26, 2003


Favorite Golfer:
    Ben Crenshaw
Favorite Golf Course:
    All except Shorecliffs


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 10:18 AM
You can't beat the Turbulators!

For me, the title should be Should You Buy 5 New Drivers Every Year? The answer is yes.

[[Edited by sparky14 on Saturday December 26, 2020 10:19 AM]]
REPLY
 Message #97386 - This was a reply to message #97385
SBogey
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?

SoCal Community Staff

GK Event: Played in a GK Event GKGC Par: GKGC Par Supporter SCGA GK Golf Club: Member

Member Since:
    September 12, 2007


Favorite Golfer:
    Phil/Day/
Favorite Golf Course:
    Eagle Falls


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 11:43 AM
I have had the same driver for at least 10 years. This year I went to Dick's to try out the newest drivers. I hit my current driver a bit over 200 and find the fairway between 60 and 70% of the time. When I tested the Maverick , Pings newest and the Cobra drivers I was averaging 180. They were a bit straighter but I could not justify a 30 to 40 yard loss. It made me wonder if the real test is the ball! Much cheaper to change balls than clubs and I find some definitely go farther, so no. To me it is not worth spending that much just to look cool!
REPLY
 Message #97387 - This was a reply to message #97386
Alex326
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GK Event: Played in a GK Event Birdie Chain: Stake Holder BCB Birdie Chain GKGC EAGLE: GKGC Eagle Supporter

Member Since:
    November 20, 2015


Favorite Golfer:
    N/A
Favorite Golf Course:
    Pebble Beach


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 5:56 PM
I don't think any of the equipment manufacturer's expect golfers to buy a new driver Every year. Similar to the fact that Chevy releases a new Corvette every year (with the exception of 1983) but they certainly don't expect consumers to buy a new one every year. Not sure why golfers get upset at companies continually coming out with new equipment. If a top company only came out with new stuff every 5-10 years I'd question their R&D department and think they were second rate.

I bought my M1 because I wanted the carbon fiber. Not for a performance reason but because in cycling everything is carbon fiber so I thought it was cool. I bought the SIM 3 wood before my GK cup match with Matt at Spyglass because it matched my outfit !!! I should note that I still have the shaft from my M1 on my current driver. The shaft in my opinion has more performance value than any of the driver heads within the last 4-5 years.

I just wish that the companies would offer older golf balls. I love the performance of the 2018 TP5x better than the 2020 version.
REPLY
 Message #97389 - This was a reply to message #97387
michaelko
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
NorCal Community Staff

GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    October 1, 2003


Favorite Golfer:
    N/A
Favorite Golf Course:
    N/A


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 6:27 PM
I've typically bought a driver when it breaks. And when I get the new club, it's a noticeable difference in performance and forgiveness. I think my history is this:all titleist

early 2000s: 975J
2010ish: 910D2
2018: 917D, which is my current driver, and the first time I was properly fit.

The TS was the next generation after that, and my 70 year old playing partner gained 40 yards and crazy height with that driver. Another 60 year old partner saw that, and he bought one, gained 20 yds and crazy height. So when the TSi came out, I was intrigued. I just test drove the TSi2. Only 2-3 years this time, but the difference is noticeable. Ordered it, even though I haven't broken my 917.
REPLY
 Message #97390 - This was a reply to message #97389
PokerGuy0826
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GKGC Par: GKGC Par Supporter SCGA GK Golf Club: Member GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    July 3, 2020


Favorite Golfer:
    Freddy Couples
Favorite Golf Course:
    TPC Sawgrass


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 6:50 PM
Being a bowling pro for years and working in various Pro Shops we deal with the same issues year in and year out. Each company releases numerous balls every year and the differences, although real, are so small because of manufacturers restrictions, that unless you're throwing every shot the same and hitting the same mark every time, it simply doesn't make any difference to your average bowler. Average being the key here!!

I've had new equipment over the years that have shown dramatic differences, but all things being the same, I couldn't justify the expense to try and keep up with the newest all the time ( and I get a lot of free equipment )from bowling manufacturers. Mid to high handicap golfers are very similars to mid to high handicap bowlers, if they focus more on fundaments and hitting their shots more consistently they will find all the success they need without emptying the wallets every year to have the newest and coolest equipment. On the other hand, as a shop guy, I love all the guys looking for equipment to make their games better, it keeps me in business!!!

[[Edited by PokerGuy0826 on Sunday December 27, 2020 6:58 AM]]
REPLY
 Message #97392 - This was a reply to message #97385
FirstFlightFX-101
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GKGC Par: GKGC Par Supporter GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    August 29, 2019


Favorite Golfer:
    Dave Stockton
Favorite Golf Course:
    Oak Q & V, Rancho DelSol


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Saturday December 26, 2020 10:00 PM
QUOTED  Mid to high handicap golfers are very similars to mid to high handicap bowlers, if they focus more on fundaments and hitting their shots more consistently they will find all the success they need without emptying the wallets every year to have the newest and coolest equipment

Hmmm, I resemble that! ;-)

I scored on a bunch of puma and linksoul fashion for Xmas...I'm going to play better because I will look and feel better. Bam!
REPLY
 Message #97393 - This was a reply to message #97392
sngernz
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?

GK Event: Played in a GK Event GKGC Par: GKGC Par Supporter

Member Since:
    January 24, 2005


Favorite Golfer:
    Bubba!
Favorite Golf Course:
    Spyglass Hill


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Sunday December 27, 2020 11:51 AM
Appreciate this, Nick. What would you recommend to someone who does not want to pay the $500+ for a new driver that includes fitting? Personally, I cannot justify the expense but my Callaway is now 6 years old and an upgrade would be nice.
REPLY
 Message #97397 - This was a reply to message #97396
Nickesquire
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GK Event: Played in a GK Event SCGA GK Golf Club: Member GKGC EAGLE: GKGC Eagle Supporter

Member Since:
    August 11, 2007


Favorite Golfer:
    Jack-Freddie-Tiger-Rory
Favorite Golf Course:
    Pebble Poppy Maderas


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Monday December 28, 2020 11:28 AM
Agree with much of the above sentiments. I think there is a great deal of difference in a 2020 Driver and say a 1990 Driver. However, my gut feeling that there isn't that much difference in a Driver within the last few years would seem to be validated by the testing in this article. Unfortunately, I could not get the chart to transfer into the GK forum that had the carry distances, total distances, spin ratio's etc. for the 5 years of Drivers tested.

Unless forced to, I have usually played the same Driver for many more rounds than most would with good results. I have no idea how many shots a Driver has in them before they start to degrade. 500? 1,000? 5,000? 10,000? But I have played Drivers for at least 500 rounds multiple times in my life and could not tell any real difference from the first round until the last round played with them. Throw on a new grip every golf season, good to go. Only changed shafts if they broke. Broke one thumping the ground after a poor shot, but trunks claimed more shafts than anything else.

I really liked the look and feel of the TaylorMade M2 as an example. For me (and probably most golfers), it all gets down to what are YOU comfortable with? The look, the feel, the shape of the head all play a part. Even the sound of a well hit shot varies from club to club.

Agree with Alex that the shaft makes a world of difference. The stiffness, the kick point etc. Anyone who thinks a stiff shaft is just a stiff shaft needs to go hit about a dozen different ones with the same club head from different manufacturers. You would be amazed the difference. Most shaft manufacturers have a half dozen+ shaft models in each stiffness range. Some designed to fly the ball higher or lower. Some designed to produce less or more spin. Some that are almost a Regular +, others that are basically an Extra Stiff -. Watching the same exact head consistently produce ball flights not within 10 yards of each other would have been more than I though possible until I tried them.

I would highly recommend multiple fitting sessions for anyone looking for a new Driver. Session one, to narrow down the manufacturer and model to at least a short list. Then use session two to narrow down the shaft.

Fittings? I had very good results @ the PGA Superstore in Palm Desert. Jeff was exceptional. Fitting was free, he went and got whatever club I wanted to hit. He also suggested others that I tried. I hit a bunch of different clubs and finally different shafts. Spent two hours with him two days in a row before deciding on new irons and woods. I could definitely see how the tour pro's could greatly take advantage of what (to us) are relatively minor differences in technology.

Buying brand new or barely used Drivers one generation down from current usually means $75 - $125 below what the new ones are going for. You can sometimes still find mint Drivers two generations from the current model in stores on clearance that would produce another $50 - $100 off.

You cannot get fitted for them, but I have had mostly good results purchasing both new and used clubs online. The more reputable the site, the better your ultimate results will likely be. eBay has a $$$ back guarantee that I received no questions asked on the 2 orders I made where I did not get what I asked for as an example.

I searched online for specific clubs with specific shafts and lofts that I knew from testing were what I wanted. There are some REAL nice used clubs online that you can get for $100 to $200 below what you would buy a brand new one in the store for. But you need to know what club and shaft you want beforehand for that to work well. And really look at the pics and the description provided.

Drivers that are three or more generations from the current model? You have to look, but there are hundreds of used ones available online. Even some brand new ones. I found a brand new, never been hit 2017 Taylormade M2 that I paid slightly more than half of what I paid for one when they were the current model 4 years ago. It was actually an upgrade (one model newer) from the 2016 Taylormade M2 that I had been playing for probably 500 rounds. New one now has about 20 rounds on it.
REPLY
The goal has always been long and straight! But since I can no longer hit them long, hopefully straighter could be achieved more than occasionally?
 Message #97402 - This was a reply to message #97397
kevbig
RE: Does it make sense to switch Drivers every year?
GK Event: Played in a GK Event

Member Since:
    March 15, 2007


Favorite Golfer:
    Tiger Woods
Favorite Golf Course:
    Palmer Course- Turtle Bay


RPGC MAIL USER VIEW USER REGISTRY ADD USER TO BUDDY LIST
Monday December 28, 2020 4:32 PM
I generally change drivers every 5-6 years when the face on my current driver starts wearing out and I can see significant losses in distance and accuracy.


QUOTED  The TS was the next generation after that, and my 70 year old playing partner gained 40 yards and crazy height with that driver. Another 60 year old partner saw that, and he bought one, gained 20 yds and crazy height. So when the TSi came out, I was intrigued. I just test drove the TSi2. Only 2-3 years this time, but the difference is noticeable. Ordered it, even though I haven't broken my 917.


My current gamer is the 913D2 but I played my round with the TSi2 yesterday for the first time and I can definitely say that Titleist has a winner on their hands with this generation
REPLY
 Message #97406 - This was a reply to message #97402

Listing 1 to 10 of 10 Replies

PAGES: 1

[ Community Page ]