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The King & Bear golf course at The World Golf Village in St. Augustine, FL is, in the words of co-designer Jack Nicklaus, “a collaboration of two friends, and an opportunity to bring a friendship together.” The “King” - Arnold Palmer - and “Bear” Jack Nicklaus, joined together to create a course where each hole exhibits characteristics of both players. For Nicklaus, it’s the wide fairways and generous landing areas off the tees whereas Palmer prefers the fast greens. At the time it was built, King & Bear was the only course in the world that the two had built together.

The King & Bear course offers five sets of tees, creating an enjoyable time for any level of golfer. From the back (Stone) tees, the course measures 7,279 yards with a course rating of 74.1 and a slope of 138. Most men will get all they can handle from the Blue Tees (6,506/70.8/131), while the Ladies play from the Green Tees to a yardage of 5,119 (69.1/124). It would be fitting to mention at this point that King & Bear has been ranked in the top 100 Women-Friendly Courses by Golf for Women Magazine.

The course meanders around pristine lakes and ponds with beautiful loblolly pines and stately oak trees throughout. These trees are spectacular to look at; that is until they impede your shot! The emphasis here is on a part of the game that both men were famous for – driving the golf ball. Water hazards are plentiful too. During the winter month, King and Bear over seeds their tee boxes, fairways and greens, producing a brilliant green color which provides a stunning contrast to the dormant Bermuda grass. It also makes for some fabulous playing conditions during the winter months. Another nice touch are the free chilled apples on the 1st tee and as you make the turn at the 10th. If you are inclines to walk the course, World Golf Village recently introduced a new caddy service. Check with the pro shop before your round to get more information.

Not far from the clubhouse is a full length driving range with multiple targets, an impressive short game area and a large practice putting green. Many players come to the King & Bear just to use the practice facilities. Range balls are included with your paid greens fee.

Inside the King & Bear clubhouse, you’ll find a full-service pro shop with all the latest logoed gear from top designers. There are men’s and women’s locker rooms with showers and changing facilities, so you can freshen up before heading home. You’ll also find The Champion’s Grille, with food fit for a King – and a Bear! The restaurant is open for breakfast and doesn’t close until 7 pm, so you can grab a bite no matter when you finish. For breakfast, you can’t go wrong with the Eggs Benedict and for lunch their chicken wings are big and meaty, and their burgers hit the spot. Rest assured, you won’t leave hungry. There are also several large screen TVs where you can catch the latest sporting events as well as a daily happy hour.

Memorable Holes: (All Yardage is from the Blue Tees)

Number 1: Par 4, 381 yards. At first glance, #1 gives you the idea that the landing area is very small, but trust me, there’s a lot of room there. Ideally, a tee shot over the water and bunker towards the left center of the fairway leaves a low to mid-iron approach into a well-guarded green. Par is a great way to start.

Number 6: Par 3, 157 yards. This par three that has it all: trees galore, water and beach bunkers. A pin placement on the right side is best attacked with a fade. Anything long and left may find the back bunker. The green is long and narrow with substantial undulation. There’s a bailout area short left of the green if you’re feeling overwhelmed.

Number 10: Par 4, 375 yards. It’s time to make a choice. A drive down the left side brings water and a coquina shelled waste area into play. The right side is the easier drive but brings a deep, menacing greenside bunker into play on your approach shot; too far right and you’ve got trees to deal with. The fairway slopes dramatically from right to left, so you may not have a choice. Another hole where par is a good score.

Number 15: Par 4, 311 yards. This is Mr. Palmer’s favorite hole on the course and is easily the most photographed. It’s s a short par 4 that requires accuracy off the tee. With large Loblolly pines on the left side and a lake to the right, a long iron, hybrid or fairway wood is all you’ll need off the tee. From there, you’ll most likely have a short or iron or pitch shot over a stunning rock wall that surrounds the peninsular green; odds are that you’ll have to carry all or part of the water. Beware of the deep bunker long and left. Make your par and thank Arnie.

Number 16: Par 4, 416 yards. Jack Nicklaus has a favorite hole here as well. It’s Number 16, a brutally long par 4, dogleg right. The oak trees down the right side keep you honest while the Loblolly pines on the left catch any shot missed that way. One particular Loblolly sits on the left side of the fairway. Regardless of how well you strike your drive, you’ll most likely be facing a long iron, hybrid or fairway wood into the green. An extremely large bunker guards the front right side of the green and catches many shots short of the green.

Last Word: The best way to derive the most pleasure from this course is to play from the tees that best suit your handicap and playing ability. When in doubt, take Jack’s advice and tee it forward. The King & Bear will surely challenge the skilled golfer while providing player-friendly conditions for the novice.

The traits of both designers are readily visible in this layout: coquina shelled waste areas and rock-fronted greens are found throughout the course. There are no outrageously long carry shots from any tee, but there is a certain amount of strategy required if you want to score well. Having an idea of where to hit you tee shot on some of the par 4 holes is something you will remember when you play the course a second time. And, as mentioned earlier, the emphasis here is on driving the ball. A good game from the tee boxes goes a long way in shooting a good score here. Compared to other Nicklaus courses, the greens are friendly, although the subtle breaks you find throughout this layout can spell trouble on the scorecard. To Arnie’s credit, the greens do tend to run fast. The course is well maintained and the staff is warm, friendly and anxious to help you make the most of your golf experience at The King and Bear.

World Golf Village, The Slammer & Squire and The King & Bear makes for a great weekend of golf, whether it’s a family outing or a mancation. Throw in the World Golf Hall of Fame, where both designers are members, and the IMAX theater and what else can a golfer ask?
10 Likes.
In 2016, Hurricane Matthew reigned terror up and down the East Coast, from Florida north to the Carolinas. Although the storm never made landfall in Florida, it did leave its calling card along the coast.

During storms like this, nothing is spared. The Ocean Course at Hammock Beach in Palm Coast, FL was one of Matthew’s casualties. The storm surge breached the barrier between the beach and the golf course, pouring thousands of gallons of salt water into the course’s irrigation system and ultimately rendering the course a total loss. Management was faced with a major decision: do they patch up the course and get it playable ASAP or close the course for a significant period of time and do some major renovations.

After considerable deliberations, a major renovation was planned, and, on October 6th, 2016, the course was closed, with a scheduled reopening set for October 2017, one year after Hurricane Matthew paid a visit. Salamander Hotels and Resorts, the owner of Hammock Beach Resort, contacted Nicklaus Design, the course’s original architect, and plans were set in motion. The renovation was to include re-grassing all fairways, greens and rough with salt water-tolerant Platinum Paspalum grass, reconstructing each tee box, bunker and green complex. Essentially, rebuilding the entire golf course. The renovation and Platinum Paspalum was put to the test several weeks ago when Hurricane Irma paid the area a visit. Remarkably, the course came through with flying colors.

On November 2nd, 2017 The Ocean Course was opened up to local and national media, government officials, as well as a number of members. You can still see some remnants of Matthew’s wrath on the property. The scrub brush that separated the beach and golf course was hit hard, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. According to Director of Golf Brad Hauer, about 10,000 golf balls were blown into the fairway by Matthew’s hurricane force winds, showing that the course is played by all caliber of golfers.

With a lot of the coast scrub brush gone, the course has been opened up and the ocean views are better than ever. Sure, the winds blow a little stronger and are more noticeable, but I think it’s a fair trade off. The Ocean Course is still the same beautiful and challenging course it was before Matthew. Other visual enhancements to the course include bright white Angle-G sand in all the bunkers. This new sand adds even more brilliance.

Water comes into play on at least twelve of the holes; more if you spray it. Several holes require forced caries, but nothing that can’t be handled if you’re playing from the right set of tees. The green complexes are marvelous and, since being redone with Platinum Paspalum grass, the greens are some of the best in the state, if not the country. There is quite a bit undulation in them, but not as radical as what I have seen on other Jack Nicklaus designs. To me, this is one of Nicklaus’ more player-friendly golf courses.

Most Memorable Hole: Number 6, 485 yards (White Tees). This dogleg left features two lakes down the left side separated by a waste bunker. Off the tee, hit the fairway or pay the price – in the way of a cluster of pot bunkers on the right side of the fairway. Unless you’re a long hitter, you’ll want to layup short of the water rather than go for the island green in two. The green has two tiers with the front sitting well below the back. Although this is a short par 5, par is a good score here.

Favorite Par 3: Number 8 or Number 17. Take your pick. These two holes are pretty similar. Number 8 plays 154 yards and Number 17 plays 138 yards; both play toward the Atlantic Ocean, so club selection is crucial. The waste bunker between the tee and green should not come into play; if it does, check with the PGA professionals in the pro shop for a lesson! Number eight’s green is elevated and guarded by three deep bunkers on the right and a nasty little pot bunker on the left. The wind typically blows in from the left, so consider an extra club and aim for the left side of the green. A ridge bisects the green and holding it off the tee can be a challenge. Pars are well earned here.

Number 17 plays 138 yards from the White Tees, back into the teeth of the winds blowing off the Atlantic Ocean. Your tee shot plays over water and a large waste bunker between the water and green. The putting surface is elevated and flanked by bunkers on either side. Ranked the easiest hole on the course, 17 offers a great chance for birdie.

Favorite Par 4: Number 9, 437 yards (White Tees). Even from up here, this is a long hole. Head to the back tees and the hole stretches to 468 yards, a whopping par 4! The hole parallels the Atlantic Coast line and usually plays into the wind. Avoid the fairway bunkers on either side off the tee and your half way there – as long as you hit it about 250 off the tee. Your approach shot will typically be a long iron, hybrid or fairway wood into a long and narrow elevated green that features two distinct tiers. Deep bunkers and grass hollows await any errant approach shots, making a difficult par that much tougher.

Favorite Par 5: Number 10, Par 5, 482 yards (White Tees). A favorite of mine because of the risk/reward, although the reward far outweighs the risk. The green is definitely reachable in two with a good drive down the left side; just avoid the fairway bunker. The two-tiered green is elevated and may require an extra club; it’s also well-guarded with four bunkers. Number 10 offers a great chance to get you back nine off on the right foot.

Last Word: As Sheila Johnson, Salamander’s Founder and CEO, so eloquently put it at the reopening ceremonies “Today, the Ocean Course reclaims its position as one of the finest golf courses in the country.” And rightfully so; it’s everything I remember and then some. The new Platinum Paspalum grass is a golfer’s delight from the tee box through the green. The course is always impeccably manicured, and the staff is passionate about what they do.

Before your round, be sure to visit the full length driving range where you can hit every club in the bag. Not a bad idea, since you’ll most likely use every one of them at some point during your round. There’s also a large practice green where you can get a feel for what awaits you on the new putting surfaces.

Tee times on the Ocean Course are not available on any of the online discount tee sheets. Basically, there are only ways you can play here: as the guest of a member or as part of one of Hammock Beach’s reasonably priced golf packages.
7 Likes.
Most golfers are familiar with Tom Watson the PGA Tour golfer, winner of eight major championships, including five British Opens and outdueling Jack Nicklaus on several occasions. He certainly was fun to watch.

Not as many people are familiar with Tom Watson the golf course architect. As a golfer, Tom Watson was praised for his passionate play, attention to detail and outstanding course strategy. His company, Tom Watson Design, employs the same integrity, dedication and focus to each of their designs. The company only builds one or two courses each year using a few fundamental requirements: beauty, variety and challenge. Each course design will challenge a golfer’s mental and physical skills and at the same time provide a memorable golf experience. This is especially evident at the Watson-designed Conservatory Course; part of the Hammock Beach Resort in Palm Coast, Florida.

In their January 2008 issue, Golf Digest ranked The Conservatory third on its elite list of America’s Best New Public Courses. And with good reason. As you meander through the course, you will encounter some breathtaking sights: waterfalls, babbling brooks and veneered field stone work.

Not finding a suitable set of tees to play from is not possible; there are seven of them ranging in distance from 7,740 yards to 5,168 yards. From the back tees, The Conservatory is the longest course in Florida. Move up to the fourth (White) set of tees, and you’ll have a manageable distance of 6,281 yards. Ladies typically play from the Red Tees (5,225 yards).

There is a lot of mounding and undulation at the Conservatory, not only on the greens but all down the fairways and roughs. Conservatory is anything but your typical Florida course and for this reason some players may find it too much. If that’s the case, my suggestion is to relax, take a deep breath and look around you. Looking back on the previous hole provides every bit as much of an inspiring view as what lays before you!

For me, what sets this course apart from any other I have played around the world is the bunkering; there’s sand everywhere. And it comes in all shapes and forms: there are your typical greenside bunkers and coquina-shelled waste bunkers which are fairly easy to navigate. But then there are a number of pot bunkers – some visible off the tee, some not - that can wreak havoc with your score not to mention your mind. Some of these are sod-walled, which adds a true Scottish feel. Most are penal in nature; one in particular on the first hole is in play off the tee if you hit it right. The face of this bunker has to be 5 feet high and about 140 yards out. Find this bunker and you can say goodbye to par – or even bogey – on this hole! Not a great way to start.

Most Memorable Hole: Number 15, Par 4, 377 yards (White Tees). With a Tom Watson course, what you see isn’t always what you get; many shots appear more difficult than they actually are. Case in point is the 15th hole, a par 4, dogleg right. The waste bunker that runs up the right side of the fairway blends in with the bunkers on the far side of the fairway, creating the illusion that the landing area is miniscule. Trust me, it’s not; there’s plenty of room out there. The large multi-tiered green is also surrounded by sand, so it will take an accurate approach shot to get it close.

Favorite Par 3: Number 8, 134 yards. The shortest hole at The Conservatory is also the signature hole. At only 134 yards from the White Tees, the island green looks inviting. If your nerves are already shattered, there’s plenty of room to bail out to the right. The green is wider than it is deep and has plenty of undulation. Don’t get too greedy with a left pin placement.

Favorite Par 4: Number 14, 431 yards. Regardless of the tees you decide to play, this is the longest par four on the golf course and offers a great risk/reward opportunity. Longball hitters can cut off a significant amount of yardage off the tee by playing to the right of the fairway bunkers. Water guards the entire right side of this behemoth hole. For us mere mortals, it’s either a long iron or fairway wood into the green. For many, your best shot at par is to get on the green in three and one-putt.

Favorite Par 5: Actually, there are two of them. Number 4 plays 497 yards and is fairly straight away. From the back tees, number 4 stretches out to 621 yards; it’s sheer length makes it a formidable opponent. From the White Tees, it’s a manageable par 5. Off the tee, water is in play on both sides. The layup is the toughest shot on the hole and requires both accuracy and distance control. The water creeps in very close on the right while strategically placed pot bunkers on the left side and middle of the fairway make you choose to either layup short or go over them. An approach shot from the left side opens up the green. A good wedge player can score well on this hole.

Number 18 is a dogleg left that plays 592 yards from the Back Tees; 502 from a humane distance (White Tees). Pot bunkers and Florida wetlands dot the landscape up the right side, while water guards the left. Watson has provided a generous landing area at the bend in the dogleg, which will require a mid-length iron into a long and narrow green guarded tightly on the left with water and on the right with sand. Find the fairway off the tee and you’re well on your way to a good score.

Last Word: For my money, this course rates as one of the top tracks in Florida; far and away Tom Watson’s best work in the state. His use of bunkering is unrivaled on any course I’ve played; they are plentiful and penal. Avoid them if you want to score well.

Although this course can play very long for the men, ladies enjoy many benefits. From the Red Tees, the majority of hazards faced by the guys off the tee are taken out of play. All they will need to deal with are the rolling fairways and undulating greens. In building The Conservatory, Watson’s two major goals were to create course that was both beautiful and playable. He has succeeded on both fronts.

These are just a few of the memories I have of the Conservatory Course at Hammock Beach. The best way to experience this course is to book at vacation at Hammock Beach Resort in Palm Coast, FL. When doing so, be sure to package it together with a round on the newly renovated Ocean Course. Combined, these two courses offer the best one-two punch of any two courses in the state.
7 Likes.
If you’re into golf, one venue on your bucket list should be the World Golf Village in St. Augustine, FL. There’s plenty to do there, for example, you could spend all day at the World Golf Hall of Fame, taking in all the exhibits, viewing movies in the IMAX theater and testing your stroke on the Challenge Hole – reminiscent of Number 17 at Sawgrass. Or, if you’re looking to play a round of golf designed by a couple of legends, you can book a round on the Slammer and Squire Golf Course, one of two courses connected with the World Golf Village.

The Slammer & Squire Golf Course is the property’s original course and is located just a wedge shot away from the World Golf Hall of Fame. It was designed by noted golf course architect Bobby Weed with considerable input from the course’s namesakes: Sam "The Slammer" Snead and Gene "The Squire" Sarazen.

Five sets of tees plus a blended set – a combination of the Blues and Whites – makes The Slammer & Squire enjoyable for any golfer – provided you play from the set that best suits your game. From the back (Stone) tees, the course plays 6,939 yards with a course rating of 72.7 and a slope of 127. The Blue tees at 6,132 yards (69.2/121) will challenge most golfers and still enable them to leave with a little dignity. Ladies will find the Green Tees at 4,996 (68.0/115) an enjoyable test.

The Slammer & Squire opened to the public in May 1998 and features two distinct nines. The outward nine traverses through fairways lined with giant Loblolly pines, while wooden pathways and bridges guide you through traditional Florida wetlands. On the back nine you will find generous fairways, contoured greens, and plenty of water hazards. You’ll also be treated to impressive views of the World Golf Hall of Fame.

Just behind the pro shop is a full length driving range with plenty of targets, a large practice putting green as well as a short game area that includes a sand trap. The Clubhouse has a fully stocked pro shop with lots of logoed gear from a number of top apparel companies as well as Men’s and Women’s locker rooms complete with showers. Inside the clubhouse you’ll also find the Legends Grille where both breakfast and lunch are served. The food is reasonably priced and very delicious. I highly recommend the Philly Cheesesteak Sliders or the Caribbean Fish Tacos after a round of golf. The bar has all of your favorite libations as well as several domestic and craft beers on tap.

Memorable Holes (All Yardage is From the Blue Tees)

Most Memorable Hole: Number 18, Par 4, 371 yards. The distant bunker is a good line for your tee shot. With water running down the entire left side, there is ample room right of the green to bailout. The subtle undulations of the green will make your last putts quite memorable and the view of the Hall of Fame across the water is quite spectacular and definitely camera worthy.

Favorite Par 3: Number 7, 143 yards. This hole is truly a shotmaker’s delight. Fashioned after The Redan, the famous 15th at North Berwick, the flag can be attacked either by carrying the bunkers straightaway, or better yet, by fading a tee shot. This allows the ball to feed down to the hole. Miss the green and you’re most likely staring a big number right in the face. No wonder The Redan is the most copied par 3 in all of golf.

Favorite Par 4: Number 1, 358 yards. The wind will dictate how difficult this hole plays. Keep your tee shot left of the right-side fairway bunkers on this dogleg right. Make it to the dogleg off the tee and you’ll have a short approach to the slightly crowned green. Par – or better – is a good way to jump start your round.

Favorite Par 5: Number 16, 527yards. The last three holes are a daunting task and feature the longest par 5 and the longest par 4 on the course. Shot placement off tee is essential on #16. If you’re feeling good about your game thus far, you may want to take an aggressive line over the fairway bunkers in an attempt to get home in two. Should you choose to layup, you must avoid the left hazard as well as the trees on the right side. The green’s false front slopes heavily back towards the fairway.

Last Word: The Slammer and the Squire provides a challenge regardless of which tees you play from or how good you are. Low handicappers will be challenged by a number of risk/reward opportunities; playing these holes smartly will yield a low score. High handicappers will be glad to know that the greens are pretty straight forward with not a lot of hidden breaks and subtle undulations. They are quick, running about 11 or 12 on the stimpmeter. There’s a full length driving range as well as a large practice putting green and short game area to hone your skills. Should you arrive hungry or get so during your round, the Legends Grille is a great place to grab breakfast or lunch. The food is very good as are the portions. You won’t leave hungry.
12 Likes.
If you’re looking for some of the best golf between Ocala and Daytona, there is no better choice than Black Bear in Eustis. Black Bear is a P.B. Dye design and from the looks of it, his father would be proud. What it lacks in Pete Dye trademark railroad tie bunkers and risk reward carry-the-water holes, it makes up for in fairway bunkers and difficult greenside bunkers many of them nestled into the surrounding mounds. In all, there are over 120 bunkers throughout the layout.

Over the years, Black Bear has served as a qualifier for the Florida USGA Publinks Championship, as well as the Hooters and Canadian tours and the Florida PGA. Black Bear was chosen not only for the great course but also for the practice facilities; they are some of the best in the entire Orlando area. In addition to a double-ended driving range, there’s a 40,000 square-foot short game area complete with sand traps and a large putting green. One of the things you’ll want to be sure and practice on the range is your lob shot; it will come in handy on those holes where your approach shots miss the green.

On several holes, finding the fairway off the tee can be easier than at most courses; the mounding and dunes on the peripheries tend to funnel the ball back into the middle. Approaching the green from the short grass is a definite benefit as you’ll need all the help you can get to hit some of the smallest greens in the area. It’s not uncommon to find a green that’s over 150 feet long but only 35 feet wide. Or vice versa. The dunes also serve to isolate each hole, giving you the feeling that your group is the only one on the course. Although this Bermuda rough may not look difficult in its brown, dormant state, it’s cut short and still provides the same challenge.

The greens at Black Bear are a story all to themselves. Collectively, they are probably the smallest greens I have played in Florida. That said, there are a couple that are about 150 feet long, but only 35 feet wide or deep! Like the rest of the course, there’s a lot of undulation in the greens, and they are typically quick.

The par 4, 6th hole is a slight dogleg left that plays 351 yards from the Black Tees. Be sure to avoid the waste bunker on the left that sits well below the fairway, it makes getting on in regulation very difficult. A good drive will leave a short to mid iron approach shot to a well-elevated green and may require an extra club. The green presents a difficult bump and run opportunity; in addition to being elevated, it’s fronted by deep bunkers on either side as well as two in back.

Number 9 has the Dye name written all over it as evidenced by the pot bunker that sits in the middle of the fairway. From the Black Tees, the hole plays 391 yards, so for most golfers the bunker is not in play off the tee, but rest assured, it’s there. Your approach shot needs to carry the green as another massive bunker with a huge lip sits directly in front. Par is a good score here.

The 388 -yard Par 4, Number 10 is another hole that doglegs slightly to the left, daring you to try and cut the corner, however with out of bounds looming down the entire left side of the tee, the risk outweighs the reward. Playing down the right side may add a little length to the hole, but it also provides an easier approach as it takes much of the sand and water on the left side out of play.

At only 107 yards from the Black Tees, number 15 may seem like a pushover but the bunkers and green suggest otherwise. This short hole has no less than 9 bunkers around the green awaiting errant tee shots and the green is over 50 yards long and only 15 yards wide. The undulation in the green also makes for some interesting putts.

The two finishing holes at Black Bear Golf Club not only define the course, they are two of the three hardest holes on the course. Number 17 plays 413 yards from the Black Tees. Hitting a good drive often catches the downslope in the middle of the fairway and leaves a manageable shot into a green that sits about 30 feet above the fairway. Anything left and short is likely to find one of the 4 sand traps that adorn the area.

Water comes into play on Number 18 and dominates the hole. From the Black Tees, anything hit longer than 265 yards is likely wet. The hole is 386 yards long with a bunker in the landing area on the right side. A good drive down the middle will still leave about 140 yards over water into an elevated, long, narrow green with a bunker back right. End your round with two pars or better and there’s a good chance you’re in the money!

Last Word: If your golf course has the name “Dye” associated with it, odds are you’re going to garner some special attention, and rightfully so. P.B. Dye has done an excellent job with Black Bear, taking full advantage of the sandy, rolling terrain. The elevation changes are significant for this part of the state and the elevated greens have you constantly thinking about club selection. There’s plenty of room off the tee which is good, because Black Bear is all about your approach shot. You’re often playing uphill and into odd-shaped greens, many of which are very long yet extremely narrow. There’s also a lot of undulation in them. If you’re going to post a low score at Black Bear, you’ll need to have one of your best days of chipping, pitching and putting.


In the event your highly competitive golf match is tied at the end of 18 holes, Black Bear offers a way to break the tie: The 19th Hole, a short shot over the water to settle the score once and for all. The course allows golfers of all abilities to have some fun and enjoy the challenge of playing a wide open but challenging tournament standard undulating links style layout.

Black Bear’s clubhouse features a pro shop with all of the necessary golf accessories as well as men’s and women’s “Dare the Bear” logoed golf apparel. The restaurant/lounge serves breakfast and lunch as well as all of your favorite libations. They have all of the traditional clubhouse food as well as some not so common items such as Bavarian pretzels with white cheese sauce and gyros. If you’re a chicken wing connoisseur, try their Kennedy sauce, a combination of several other sauces. It has a very interesting taste.

For what you get, the greens fees are more than reasonable. In season rates are ridiculously low and off season or “shoulder” rates often include something “extra” such as a hat, polo or lunch. Rounds to Black Bear can also be purchased on many of the major online tee sheets.
8 Likes.
Over the past several years, the Panama City Beach area has really cleaned up its act. No longer is it college’s spring destination for uninhibited college kids. The real estate market is booming, area businesses are rebounding nicely, and the hotel industry is once again beginning to flourish. All is good in Florida’s panhandle.

And all is good at the Sheraton Bay Point Resort – Panama City Beach’s premier golf destination. The resort is situated on historic St. Andrews Bay and is a perfect getaway destination for couples, families and golfers. Yes, golfers. The property, which is home to 36 holes of bay front golf including the panhandle’s only Nicklaus design, recently underwent a complete remodel of the lodging, restaurants and golf clubhouse and the final results are nothing short of amazing. Sheraton Bay Point is the only AAA 4-Diamond franchise hotel along the Emerald Coast, with 320 sharply appointed guest rooms, 65 of which are one-bedroom suites. Located about a 7-iron away from the main hotel and on the fairway of the Nicklaus Course’s 3rd and 6th holes is a collection of golf villas that feature both hotel style rooms as well as one-bedroom suites that can sleep up to four golfers comfortably.

Sheraton Bay Point also features several dining options, including the ultra-casual Flip-Flops Pool Bar, where you can enjoy custom crafted cocktails and craft beers while dining on Mahi Mahi Tacos and Buffalo Chicken Sandwiches. If you’re looking for something more upscale, Tides Restaurant offers spectacular views of St. Andrews Bay, which are only outdone by the culinary staff’s creativity. They’ve recently added a Chop House menu, which includes cuts of high-end beef such as the Wagyu Filet and a 26-oz. porterhouse steak. Another great choice for breakfast or lunch is Bar 72, located at the golf course clubhouse. Bar 72 is a little more than your typical burgers and dogs clubhouse fare. Try the shepherd’s pie or the meatloaf stack and you’ll be pleasantly surprised!

On property and a short cart ride away from the hotel are two of northwest Florida’s finest golf courses: The Willard Byrd designed Meadows Course and the Nicklaus Course. The Nicklaus Course is the crown jewel at Bay Point and plays 7,152 yards from the back tees with a rating of 74.3 and a slope of 143. Most golfers will be challenged from Tee 2 (6,430/70.7/132) and still leave with a little dignity intact. Ladies will be tested from a distance of 4,974 yards, yet still enjoy themselves.

The first five holes of the Nicklaus Course set the tone for your round. The first hole showcases the water that can become your nemesis on 17 of the next 18 holes. It’s a dogleg right around a lake that requires an accurate shot off the tee up around the 150-yard marker. From there, you’ll have a slightly uphill approach to a green protected in the front by two deep bunkers. Number 2 is a tough par 3 that plays 171 yards (Tee 2) over water to a green protected on the left by water and front right by a large deep bunker. The water on Number 3 shouldn’t come into play; if it does, check with the pro shop about getting a lesson. It’s a modest par 4, dogleg left with the most dramatic false-fronted green I have ever seen; it has to be at least a 6-foot drop. The green features a lot of undulation and a two-putt or better is a good thing.

Number 4 is a par 4, that plays 384 yards (Tee 2) and features a green abutted by water on the left. All of this leads up to Number 5, the most scenic and demanding hole on the course and by far the most interesting. Play your tee shot about 225 yards over wetlands to an “island” fairway. From there’ you’ll have a long iron shot over more wetlands to a long narrow green with not much room behind it. Par is a good score here.

Two of the three remaining par 3s require you to choose the right club and trust your distance; knowing the pin position is also critical. Numbers 7 and 17 are both fairly long with blind shots into the green. Choose the right club, hit your best shot and enjoy the fruits of your labor!

The back nine also features several intriguing holes including the drivable Number 13 which plays 281 yards from Tee 2. Beware of the small grove of pine trees if you push your drive right; the green is protected by water to the left and a deep bunker to the right. Number 14 is the course’s #1 handicapped hole; a long dogleg right that plays over water and sand off the tee. Your approach shot plays over a lake which also guards the right side of the green. There’s a bunker back left that catches anything long. This hole takes four solid shots to make par.

Number 18 is a great finishing hole and is almost the mirror image of the opening hole. It requires a forced carry over water that plays all the way down the left side, with more of the wet stuff short and right of the green. A tee shot over the water and slightly left of the fairway bunker will leave a short pitch shot into an elevated triangular green protected on all three sides by sand. A great end to a great round.
8 Likes.
The Meadows Course dates back to 1965 and uses the original 328 Bermuda pushup greens. They’re still in great shape, a lasting testament to a good grounds crew. The Meadows plays 6,913 yards from the back tees. Tee 2 plays about 550 yards shorter and is still a challenge for most. This course has stood the test of time and can play tough – especially if you tend to spray the ball. Case in point is Number 4, a narrow par 4 (372 yards from Tee 2), slight dogleg right that is the course’s #1 handicap. Center or just left of center off the tee is the preferred shot, just be sure to avoid the fairway bunker on the left. From there, trust your club selection into a small, elevated, triangular green protected on all sides by sand.

Number 5 is the course’s first par 5 (480 yards from Tee 2) and is also a narrow driving hole, however, with a good tee shot, it is reachable on two. Water comes into play on the left side about 250 yards off the tee, so favor the right. For most players, it’s a three-shot hole and an approach from the left side takes a few of the infringing pines on the right side out of play. The green is small and well protected. Number 9 (509 yards from Tee 2) is the second par 5 on the outward 9 and this double dogleg is a good test of your shotmaking ability. Water short and left of the green sees a lot of action and the elevated green is large and may require an extra club, depending on pin position.

Number 10 is a long par 4 (409 yards from Tee 2) with water on the right off the tee that creeps into the fairway and catches unsuspecting players. Most players will need to hit a long approach shot into a shallow green. Par is a good score here. Number 13 is the most picturesque hole on the course, a short par 3 (132 yards from Tee 2) over water into a well-protected green. Choose the right club off the tee and a low score is possible.

The Meadows also finishes with one of the layout’s most memorable holes, a 384-yard (Tee 2) dogleg right par 4 with bunkers on either side off the tee right at the bend. A good drive will leave a mid to long iron into a small green protected on the right with water and sand on either side. Another strong finishing hole.

The winter months are a great time to visit the resort and take advantage of everything Bay Point has to offer. And, since Northwest Florida’s seasonality peaks in the summer, a great value can be had between January and March.

If you’re coming down from the northern states during the winter to play golf, here’s something to consider. Yes, you can get about 5 degrees warmer in February if you go down to the Orlando area, but is 6 hours of drive time each way worth it? Go to Panama City and you can use that 12 hours of windshield time and get in two or three extra rounds of golf. Couple that with the money you’ll be saving on a round of golf and the decision is easy.
8 Likes.
Odds are that Kemmons Wilson is not a household name or even a name that comes up every now and then in golf locker rooms around the country, but believe it or not, the man had a lot to do with the proliferation of professional golf in the US. Wilson is the founder of Holiday Inn and if you were to ask any professional golfer from the 50’s and 60’s, you’ll probably hear stories of how Holiday took them in and gave them a place to stay while they competed.

On the other hand, the name Arnold Palmer is a household name; it’s probably safe to say that, because he dabbled in so many other things beside golf, his name is well-known outside of golf too. Arnold Palmer has arguably done as much for golf as anyone else.

Put these two together and what do you get? The Legends Course at Orange Lake Resort in Orlando, Florida.

Orange Lake Resort is known for upscale condo-style accommodations, villas and timeshares as well as a complete array of amenities that include swimming pools, tennis, miniature golf, a fitness center, lots of dining and meeting room options, 2 championship 18-hole golf courses and two executive courses; one that is lit for night play.

Arnold Palmer Design Group built the Legends Course. There are five sets of tees to challenge men and women of all abilities. The Back Tees measure 7,072 yards with a slope rating of 132 and a course rating of 72.2. I found the Blue Tees at 6,263 yards (71.1/124) was the perfect length for my game and allowed me to leave with a little dignity still intact. Seniors will be challenged at 5,780 yards (68.7/120) while ladies will enjoy the Yellow Tees (5,188/92.3/120). Pick the tees that best match your game and you’re sure to have a good time.

The Legends Course is a tale of two nines. The front side – sometimes referred to as the Links Nine – features wide fairways with significant landing areas and lots of rolling terrain. The Links Nine is much longer than the back (Pines) nine and has a real resort feel as it winds through the various lodging options of the resort. Water comes into play on about 4 holes on the outward nine as opposed to 7 of nine holes on the inward side. Many of these water hazards are pressed up against the greens and create precarious approach shots. The Pines Nine also features several fairways lined with Florida pines and majestic live oak trees that create narrow corridors off the tee. Several holes feature rock retaining walls that front the greens – a Palmer Design trademark.

Most Memorable Hole: Number 18: Par 5, 400 yards (Blue Tees). This long, dogleg left features water on the left side that starts into play about 250 yards off the tee. There is also fairway bunker in play on the left side off the tee and a waste bunker on the right. A good tee shot will still leave a long to mid-iron into and elevated green protected by sand and water on the left and a lot of mounding on the right.

Favorite Par 3: Number 3, 200 yards (Blue Tees). This long par 3 plays slightly downhill, but not quite a club less. It’s well protected on either side by deep-lipped bunkers that can make for a tough sandy. This can be a tough hole on a windy day, so choose your club wisely off the tee.

Favorite Par 4: Number 13, 375 yards (Blue Tees). Aesthetically, this signature hole is probably the nicest hole on the course. Your tee shot is blind and uphill; just aim for the middle of the fairway. From there, you should have a mid-iron downhill over water into a large multi-tiered green that features a lot of undulation. It’s a fun hole to look at; it’s even better to play!

Favorite Par 5: Number 4, 565 yards. Number 4 doglegs to the right and then back to the left, with all kinds of trouble along the way. It’s a double dogleg that features water on the right off the tee that comes into play if you try to get greedy. Steer clear of the water off the tee and you’ll have plenty of room for your layup shot. As the hole makes the second dogleg, you’ll be faced with a large waste bunker on the left side. If your approach shot is in the 150+ yards range, you’re facing a blind approach shot into a very small green protected front right and left by bunkers and water if you go long.

Last Word: The Legends Course at Orange Lake Resort is anything but your typical resort course. There are a lot of doglegs – both right and left – that require both length and accuracy to set up a second shot. There are a lot of elevation changes – 10 feet is a lot in this part of Florida – that create blind tee shots and layups. Large lips on many of the bunkers add a bit of difficulty getting it close out of the sand. And the greens – although a little on the slow side – feature a lot of undulation. Several have ridges in the middle that create multiple tiers. Another atypical feature about the Legends Course is the small greens; they really test your accuracy.

After your round, be sure to stop by the Legacy Grill, located in the Legend’s clubhouse. Guests can relax either indoors or out in the comfortable sports-themed setting. Enjoy food and drink with friends and family, all served by a friendly, knowledgeable staff. The restaurant is open from 11:00 AM – 10:00 PM, so breakfast, lunch and dinner are all in play. The menu is vast and has something for even the most discriminating of pallets. They also serve all your favorite post-golf libations.

The next time you find yourself in the Disney area with your golf clubs and several hours to kill, give the Legends Course at Orange Lake Resort a call
9 Likes.
Forest Lake Golf Club – Just You, Nature and That Little White Ball

As Florida golf courses go, Forest Lake is an anomaly. Oh sure, it has all the trappings of your typical Florida daily fee golf facility: pristine, natural lakes, a wide variety of Florida flora and fauna, gently rolling fairways and large undulating greens. But what sets Forest Lake apart from other courses in the Orlando area is the homes – or in this case, the lack thereof. It is a true Parkland golf experience.

Forest Lake is located in Ocoee, FL, and sits on over 218 acres of Central Florida’s ridge area, which provided the golf course design firm of Clifton, Ezell and Clifton tons of superb sandy loam. The course also sits atop the City’s effluent disposal field, giving them adequate access to water for irrigation, a precious commodity in the Florida golf industry. Also, the course drains very well, so you just might find yourself being able to get out and play a round of golf here, while other courses remain closed after inclement weather.

The course opened in 1994 and has been rated 4-Stars by Golf Digest in their Places to Play. Forest Lake features five sets of tees, setting up a playable yardage for all golfers, from seasoned professionals to beginners. From the back tees, the course measures 7,221 yards with a slope of 133. Most golfers will find that the Blue Tees (6387 yards/126 slope) will provide all the golf course they can handle and still leave with a little dignity. Ladies will be challenged from the Red Tees which measure 5065 yards with a slope rating of 117.

Forest Lake boasts a pretty impressive practice facility. There’s a full length driving range where you can hit every club in the bag, a chipping area with “blast” bunker and a large practice putting green. On our visit, the range was packed with players of all ages and abilities.

Lush, rolling fairways are generous off the tees and give way to large, undulating greens that can be hard to read for a first-time player, as I experienced. They may not be the quickest in the area, but they roll true and are consistent from hole to hole. The more you play them, the better you’re going to do.
The front side has some modest roll to it and the first hole demands an accurate tee shot between a couple of lakes, but from there the hole opens up. For most players it’s a three-shot par 5, however with a great tee shot, the green is reachable. Sand guards the front left side of the green with large mounding protecting the right front.

The par 3 holes out here are very challenging; from the back tees: you won’t find one less than 210 yards. The second hole is the only one without water and features a very long and deceptive tiered green. Anyone who feels that par 3s are the easiest holes on a golf course needs to book a round on Forest Lake!

Holes 3-7 are situated on the western side of the 429 Expressway; you get there by taking the tunnel underneath the road. Like most of the holes they are tree lined; you better have control of your irons if you’re going to score well over here. The seventh hole is the shortest par 4 and, depending on the tee placement could be in reach for big hitters. The green is protected by a deep greenside bunker.

If your tendency is to hit the ball left, number 9 could prove to be a bit of a problem. It’s a 405-yard (Blue Tees) par 4, with a large fairway bunker on the left side in the landing area and another large bunker that guards the entire left side. Keep it right and your problems will be limited.

For me, the back nine had a lot of character and featured more subtle elevation changes from hole to hole. The final six holes were all memorable, especially the par 3 holes. Number 13 is a long double dogleg par 5 that demands an accurate tee shot to avoid the massive waste bunker on the right and fairway bunker on the left, and then an accurate layup shot that makes it to the second dogleg, yet avoids the fairway bunker in the landing area. Success to this point will leave a short pitch shot to a small, softly undulating green. Three well executed shots from tee to green can result in a low number.

Number 14 is a par 3 and is undoubtedly the course’s signature hole. From the Blue Tees, it plays 170 yards and is not only the most photographed on the course, it’s one of the toughest par 3s in the area. It’s all carry over water with expansive bunkers front left and back right. The green features some deceptive undulations.

The 15th hole plays 342 yards (Blue Tees) and is very photogenic, with a creek crossing the middle of the fairway. If you’re playing either of the back two sets of tees, the creek can easily come into play, however from all other tee boxes it’s easy to carry and the hole becomes a relatively short dogleg right. If you want to cut the corner of the dogleg, go for it. Just be wary of the trees that can impair your approach shot to a long but narrow green that’s well protected by bunkers. Believe it or not, this hole is handicapped the toughest on the back side. From the back tees, I can see why.

If the first par 3 on the back side didn’t get your attention, Number 16 certainly will. It plays about the same length – 163 yards from the Blue Tees - but offers a little bit of relief with a bailout area left of the green. Anything right will find the water or foliage and anything long will find the sand. This is another par 3 where par is good.

Number 17 is a dogleg left par 4 that plays 342 yards and, if you haven’t played the course before, you might think it goes right. The landing area is framed by bunkers and there is a fair amount of sand to the right of the green. Two well struck shots can set up a makeable birdie opportunity.

Forest Lake finishes strong with a 425 yard, par 4 dogleg left that requires an accurate tee shot between two bunkers. This leaves a long to mid iron slightly uphill into a small green surrounded by sand. A challenging end to a challenging golf course.

Last Word: Forest Lake is a Take-Your-Clubs-Out-Of-The-Trunk-Throw-Them-on-A-Cart-And -Head-To-The-First-Tee kind of place. The bag drop is easily accessible and the carts are right there. Greens fees are some of the lowest in the area, year-round! The staff is friendly and knowledgeable and leaves you feeling welcome and wanting to return. The beverage cart runs every day! In fact, the guys who designed the course years ago – George Clifton and Ken Ezell - still own and operate it; that’s how much they think of Forest Lake.

All carts are equipped with the Pro Shot GPS system which provides accurate yardage to the front, center and middle of the green as well as distance to and over hazards. No maps, everything is displayed in text format. Simple is definitely better.

Water comes into play on about 8 holes and with the exception of the two par 3s on the back, there are no unmanageable forced caries. For the most part, the wet stuff can be found on the peripheries of the fairways, forcing you to hit it straight or pay the price.

The day we played, the pace of play was fantastic. We played as a twosome and had a threesome in front of us. I felt like we were constantly being held up, yet we finished the round in a little more than 4 hours including a short brake at their Rusty Niblick Grill. And, in case you’re wondering, they did end up letting us play through!

Forest Lakes offers an annual membership that includes year-round discounts on greens and cart fees, 8-day advanced tee times, USGA handicap service, discounted range balls and a 10% discount on pro shop merchandise. You’ll also be eligible for Forest Lake’s annual tournaments including the Club Championship.

For more information or directions to the course, visit www.forestlakegolf.com.
7 Likes.
Windsor Parke Golf Club is a semi-private, 18-Hole championship golf course designed by Arthur Hills and has been recognized as one of Florida's top 100 courses. Over the years, Windsor Parke has hosted more USGA qualifying events than any other course in the city of Jacksonville; qualifiers for such tournaments as the US Open, US Amateur, US Publinks and US Senior Amateur. It’s also recognized by the NGCOA as a “Beginner Friendly” golf course.

There are four sets of tees that play anywhere from 5206 yards for the ladies to 6765 yards for accomplished players. Average players will find the White Tees (6,003) yards a fitting challenge. In the clubhouse, you will find a well-stocked pro shop with a plethora of logoed apparel and a restaurant/lounge area that offers all your favorite clubhouse foods and adult beverages. Windsor Parke is also a good place to tune up your game with great practice facilities, including a targeted grass range that lets you hit every club in the bag as well as putting and chipping greens.

This championship layout has Arthur Hills written all over it with its rolling fairways, elevation changes and strategically placed bunkers. Several holes feature forced carries over water, including 3 of the 4 par 3 holes and a couple of par 4s. That doesn’t include carries that macho golfers will encounter when they try to reach the par 5 greens in two.

Off the tees, the fairways are fairly easy to find, however several approach shots leave little room for error. For the most part, greens are fairly level with subtle undulations. As always, greens in regulation often equate to good scores. Hills also had some fun with green complexes, as can be seen from the devilish little pot bunkers around the 8th green. Here are a few of the favorites:

Pro’s Pick: Number 4: Par 4, 388 yards (Blue Tees). A dogleg left that plays 388 yards from the Blue Tees and features water all down the left side and strategically placed bunkers on the right in the landing area. If you’re not overly long off the tee, these bunkers are a great aiming point. A decent drive will leave you about 150 yards downhill to a green protected on the left by water.

Member’s Favorite: Number 6: Par 5, 533 yards (Blue Tees). This long, straight par 5 has trees framing both sides of the fairway. The creek that crosses the fairway just in front of the green makes this a three-shot hole for most players. Par is a good score here.

My Favorite(s): Three finishing that will really test your mettle. Number 16 (par 4, 426 yards) features a narrow fairway with water all down the left side and trees lining the right. The green is protected by a large bunker on the left. Number 17 (par 5, 531 yards) is a carbon copy of 16, only 100+ yards longer and has more bunkering around the green. Number 18 (Par 4, 351 yards) requires a tee shot over water to a wide-open fairway and then an approach shot over more water to an awaiting green protected on the left by water. Par or better on these last three holes usually means a good score.

Windsor Parke is one of the best values I came across during my visit to the Jacksonville area, especially when you consider it’s an Arthur Hills layout. Members I spoke with had nothing but good things to say about what Brown Golf has done with the facility since acquiring it in 2015. They continue to make improvements to both the course and the clubhouse.

Memberships are available at Windsor Parke and include unlimited golf and use of all practice facilities with a discounted range plan, reciprocal play at all other Brown Golf facilities and a reciprocal membership at Julington Creek Golf Club.
6 Likes.
Kingsway Country Club – A Must Play, From Sarasota To Naples

If you’re looking to play a great golf course with a country club feel at daily fee rates, I suggest giving Kingsway Country Club in Lake Suzy, FL. The course is conveniently located less than a mile from I-75 just off exit 170, minutes away from Punta Gorda and Port Charlotte, an area of the state that is very popular for both retirement and relocation.

The first thing you see when you arrive at the property is the clubhouse, an 18,000-square foot Old Florida style building with a lot of class. Inside is a large grille room with multiple large, flat screen TVs to catch all your favorite sporting events, a game room and a very elegant dining room, where you can have an intimate dinner party for that special someone or host a gala event. Kingsway’s outside verandah is also a great place to relax and enjoy a cold one after your round.

Before your round, you owe it to your golf game to warm up on Kingsway’s spacious driving range. Here you’ll find an unlimited supply of range balls, an excellent short game area with a chipping green and practice bunker and a massive practice green. You will find that the practice facility is as meticulously maintained as the golf course; you may just feel like spending the day on the range.

Kingsway Country Club originally opened in 1976 and in 2005 went through a complete redesign by golf course architects Ron Garl and Chip Powell. From the back tees, the course plays 7,001 yards with a course rating of 75.0 and a slope of 137. With six sets of tees to choose from, golfers of all abilities can play from a yardage they are comfortable with. I found that Tee No. 3 (6,129/71.6/131) provided a very fitting challenge.

One of the nice things about this course is the proximity of the greens to the next tee box, a fancy way of saying this course is easy to walk. And many players take full advantage of that, especially during the season. Even with walkers, it’s still easy to get around the course in a little more than 4 hours.

Memorable Holes
Favorite Hole: Number 12, 335 yards (Tee Number 3): When Ron Garl redesigned the Kingsway Country Club course, he totally redesigned Number 12. What you have now is a short par 4 that demands accuracy off the tee and then forces you to carry the green on your approach. There is a large waste area down the left side which ends as the fairway starts to slope downward. Off the tee, carry the waste area where it meanders into the fairway and avoid the two pot bunkers on the right, and you’ll leave yourself a short pitch shot to a small, elevated green surrounded in front by sand. Although this is the shortest par 4 on the course, it is by no means a pushover.

Favorite Par 3: Number 16, 144 yards (Tee Number 3). The key to doing your best on this hole is to hit a high tee shot that lands soft and sticks. The first order of business off the tee is to clear the water and carry the bunker that fronts the green. With the green being so shallow, only a lofty tee shot will stop short of the bunker behind the green. A delicate tee shot can translate into a low score.

Favorite Par 4: Number 6, 374 yards (Tee Number 3). Number 6 offers an interesting risk/reward opportunity. With the fairway sloping from left to right, a drive that carries the left edge of the bunker will be greatly rewarded and take full advantage of the slope. Hit this shot, and you’ll be left with a short iron approach shot. If the bunker is too much to carry, play down the left side of the fairway to have the best line into a green that is heavily protected on the right side by sand and water. Another solid golf hole.

Favorite Par 5: Number 15, 509 yards (Tee Number 3). This three-shot, par 5 is Kingsway’s signature hole and for most players, it’s a 3-shot hole. That is, unless you crush your tee shot, then you may be tempted to go for it. To do that, not only will you need the drive of your life, you’ll have to hit a long, high approach shot that carries a second lake. Most players should opt to play their layup shot towards the fairway bunker on the left to avoid the waste area on the right side. Then, your approach shot is to an elevated green fronted by two bunkers. The putting green has a lot of undulation and can prove to be tricky. Make par or better and you’ve done well.

Last Word: This place has private club written all over it. From the elegance of the clubhouse, to the friendliest and most professional staff in the area, to the highly manicured grounds and golf course, non-members should consider themselves lucky to have the opportunity to play this track. Fairway divots are and filled with sand, sand bunkers are meticulously raked, and the areas around waterways are neatly trimmed. You’ll feel bad if you don’t repair your ball marks.

Many holes are well bunkered in front, forcing you to take enough club and carry your approach shot onto the green. This may make it more difficult for seniors, who prefer to bump and run the ball onto the green. Layup shots on par 5 holes need to avoid either water or sand, adding a certain level of accuracy necessary to score well on these holes. Two of the par 5s require a carry over water, but if you’re playing from the tees that best suit your handicap, it shouldn’t be a problem.

The TifEagle greens are amazing – fast and true. The subtle undulations and long, sweeping breaks on a few keep you honest on the putting green.

In addition to great golf, Kingsway Country Club is also the perfect venue for weddings, banquets, business meetings, and parties. Memberships are also available and Kingsway is unique with their various dues structures. Their ultimate equity membership includes unlimited golf with cart, unlimited use of the practice facilities, club storage and handicap service. There are also a variety of other memberships, such as a “pay as you play" program that has become very attractive to the local business community. Social and Dining memberships are also available. Call J.B. Belknap at 941-625-9827 Ext.5 or email him jbbelknap@kingswaycountryclub.com to learn more about all the options.

To learn more about Kingsway Country Club or to set up a tee time, give them a call at 941-625-9827 or visit their website: www.kingswaycountryclub.com. Kingsway was once an exclusively private club, but economic changes forced them to allow a limited amount of outside play. Sooner or later, membership is going to be back at a level that will allow them to be private again. My advice is to play it while you can. Or better yet, join!
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